You’re Sure I don’t have to buy a Diamond Ring? Really?

by Kristin Coffin May 19, 2015

You’re Sure I don’t have to buy a Diamond Ring? Really?

Hi there, gentlemen, this post is for you. A question I’m frequently asked concerns the pressure you feel to purchase a diamond engagement ring. You want to know if it’s really, truly okay to buy a ring with an alternative stone. Please know the pressure is felt subconsciously, engrained through years of marketing. It’s likely not even coming from friends, family, or most importantly, your fiancé-to-be.

For over half a century we’ve been conditioned through extremely effective advertising to think you must buy a diamond ring. The stone must be a certain size, and you must spend a few months’ salary to buy it. Inundated by images and ads, it’s easy to think diamonds are a necessity. The good news is there are gorgeous alternatives that possess all the qualities we seek in an engagement ring.

You want a ring to be beautiful, sparkling, unique, timeless, responsible, durable, and affordable -- all at once. Of the various white stone options, the gemological properties of moissanite are the most similar to diamond. Moissanite has that same brilliant sparkle, clarity, and crisp look that makes diamond feel timeless.


Top Ring: Forever Brilliant moissanite - $1125
Middle Ring: Forever Brilliant moissanite center, moissanite halo - $2100

Bottom Ring: Diamond - $3200

Some of my rings sparkling in the sun. All engagement rings are Forever Brilliant moissanites, except for one diamond ring. Can you spot it? (Hint: it’s the same ring as the photo at left – worn on the bottom ring finger in this video.)

If I didn’t tell you, would you be able to tell the difference? And it’s not just about pricing, because budget isn’t the only factor we weigh when choosing a ring. Affordability aside, moissanite’s durability means it will last for generations. Plus, it’s created right here in the US, making it a truly conflict-free choice.

In today’s engagement landscape, many couples are picking out rings and discussing stones together. If this isn’t you, there’s still a good chance your fiancé-to-be is dropping hints on sites like Pinterest or Etsy. But even equipped with that info you’re sometimes still hesitant to buy a non-diamond ring. It’s not uncommon for me to receive an inquiry from a fella that’s something along the lines of, “Her friend told me this moissanite ring is her dream ring. Can I get it with a diamond instead?” I completely understand where that request is coming from. But if she wants a moissanite ring, I’d encourage you to stick with moissanite. There are probably many reasons why she loves that ring (with its moissanite) exactly the way it is. I’ll be honest, it’s a tough conversation to have, and it’s hard to undo the years of engrained societal pressure.

The great news is that more and more women truly want an alternative, I swear. If your lady expresses her desire for a moissanite, it’s not just because she’s trying to save money. I know for a fact she wouldn’t sacrifice on something so symbolic. The ring you both select should be a representation of your personal style, your philosophy, and of your special union. It shouldn’t be selected on the basis of outside pressure.


Kristin Coffin Jewelry moissanite rings in a sampling of shapes, sizes, and settings

Already have diamonds and love them? -- Me too! I truly believe all stones have their place, and I offer options for every type of gemstone lover out there. Or if your other half adores diamonds and you know that, then go for it. I offer a great selection of conflict-free diamonds as well. This post is simply intended for the gentlemen who are hesitant to purchase an alternative stone, even though their other half has seriously hinted they don’t want a diamond. It’s the post to tell them that, I promise you, it’s A-okay to indulge her request.

Curious to learn more about other white stone options, and how they compare to one another? My next post will go into a deeper breakdown of the properties of diamond, moissanite, white sapphire, and a few other common white gems.



Kristin Coffin
Kristin Coffin

Author